Chess PGN Game Match played Viswanathan Anand vs Hikaru Nakamura- in Moscow Tal Memorial 8th, Open: Ruy Lopez – fianchetto (Smyslov/Barnes) defence

Chess PGN Game Match played Viswanathan Anand vs Hikaru Nakamura- in Moscow Tal Memorial 8th, Open: Ruy Lopez - fianchetto (Smyslov/Barnes) defence


Match between Viswanathan Anand and Hikaru Nakamura

Event: Moscow Tal Memorial 8th

Variation: Ruy Lopez – fianchetto (Smyslov/Barnes) defence

Eco code: C60

Pgn File:


[Event “Moscow Tal Memorial 8th”]
[Site “Moscow”]
[Date “2013.06.19”]
[Round “6”]
[White “Anand, Viswanathan”]
[Black “Nakamura, Hikaru”]
[Result “0-1”]
[WhiteElo “2786”]
[BlackElo “2784”]
[ECO “C60”]
[Annotator “Stohl,I”]
[EventDate “2013.06.13”]
[PlyCount “90”]
[EventType “tourn”]
[EventRounds “9”]
[EventCountry “RUS”]
[Source “ChessBase”]
[SourceDate “2013.07.16”]
[EventCategory “22”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 g6 { A sideline, but nowadays the Ruy Lopez
quite often even at the highest level isn’t only about the Berlin and
classical closed systems (Chigorin, Breyer etc.). Nakamura himself lately
successfully experimented with other systems: } (3… a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 (4…
d6 5. c3 Bd7 { is the Deferred Steinitz, which usually leads to a heavy
manoeuvring struggle after } 6. O-O g6 7. d4 Bg7 8. h3 ( { Only one of the
numerous options. In his book “Dynamic Opening Strategy” Jansa recommends }
8. Re1 Nge7 9. Be3 O-O 10. d5 Nb8 11. Bxd7 Nxd7 12. Nfd2 f5 13. f3 { with a
King’s Indian without the light-squared bishops. Although this should give
White an edge, Black has } 13… Rf7 $5 14. c4 Qf8 15. Nc3 Bh6 16. Bf2 Bxd2
17. Qxd2 f4 18. b4 g5 19. c5 Rg7 20. Qe2 Nf6 21. Kh1 Kh8 22. Na4 Qf7 23.
Rac1 Rag8 $132 { Stehno,P (2366)-Radulski,J (2502)/Brno/2005/ }) 8… Nf6 (
8… h6 9. Be3 Nge7 10. Nbd2 O-O 11. dxe5 dxe5 12. Bc5 Re8 13. Re1 b6 14.
Ba3 Na7 15. Bxd7 Qxd7 16. Nc4 Qe6 17. Ne3 Nb5 18. Bxe7 Rxe7 19. Qa4 Nd6 20.
Qc6 Rc8 21. Rad1 Kh7 22. Rd2 Ne8 23. Qb7 Nd6 24. Rxd6 $5 cxd6 25. Qxa6 $44
{ Caruana,F (2774)-Ivanchuk,V (2755)/Thessaloniki/2013/ }) 9. Re1 O-O 10.
Nbd2 Re8 11. Bc2 Qe7 12. Nf1 Qf8 $5 13. Ng3 Rad8 14. d5 (14. Be3 Bc8 15.
Qe2 Bh6 16. Qd2 Bxe3 17. Qxe3 Qg7 18. Rad1 Kh8 19. Qc1 h6 20. Ba4 b5 21.
Bc2 Nh5 22. Nxh5 gxh5 23. Kh1 Rg8 24. Rg1 Qf6 25. Qe3 Rg6 26. dxe5 Nxe5 27.
Nxe5 dxe5 28. Rxd8+ Qxd8 29. Rd1 Qe7 30. Rd3 Kg7 31. b4 Be6 32. Bb3 Qg5 $11
{ Landa,K (2570)-Yandemirov,V (2500)/Novgorod/1997/ }) 14… Ne7 15. Nh2
Bh6 16. Qf3 Bxc1 17. Raxc1 Qg7 18. Qe3 Nh5 $5 19. Nxh5 gxh5 20. Kh1 f5 21.
exf5 Bxf5 22. Bxf5 Nxf5 23. Qd3 Rf8 24. Nf3 Ne7 $132 { Caruana,F
(2774)-Andreikin,D (2713) /Moscow/2013/ }) 5. O-O b5 6. Bb3 Bc5 7. c3 d6 8.
d4 Bb6 { is the Neoarkhangelsk, with Shirov, Caruana and Nakamura being the
most prominent members of the fan club: } { Another important branch is }
9. a4 ( { After } 9. Be3 O-O 10. Nbd2 { the currently most topical move is
} 10… Re8 $5 ( { Caruana used to play } 10… h6 11. h3 Re8 12. Re1 Bd7
13. Bc2 Rb8 14. Rc1 Nh7 15. Bd3 Qf6 16. Nb3 Nf8 17. Kh2 g5 18. d5 Ne7 19.
c4 Bxe3 20. Rxe3 c5 21. dxc6 Bxc6 22. Kg1 Nfg6 $13 { Anand,V (2780)
-Caruana,F (2757)/Zurich/2013/ For details see the notes to this game in
CBM 153. }) (10… Bg4 11. h3 Bh5 12. dxe5 $5 dxe5 13. Qe2 Qe7 14. Rfd1 Na5
15. Nf1 Nxb3 16. axb3 Qe6 17. b4 Bxe3 18. Qxe3 Rfd8 19. Rxd8+ Rxd8 20. Ne1
$1 $36 { [%csl Rh5] Movsesian,S (2700)-Onischuk,A (2675)/WChT Ningbo/2011/
This impressive strategic game was annotated by Movsesian in CBM 144. })
11. Re1 (11. h3 Na5 12. Bc2 Bb7 13. Qb1 exd4 14. cxd4 Nc4 15. Nxc4 bxc4 16.
Nd2 Rb8 17. Nxc4 Bxe4 18. Bxe4 Nxe4 19. Qd3 Qd7 20. Rfc1 Nf6 21. Bd2 Ba7
$11 { Ponomariov,R (2733)-Giri,A (2727)/Zug/2013/ }) 11… Na5 12. Bc2 c5
13. h3 (13. dxc5 dxc5 14. Qe2 Ng4 $5 15. Nf1 Be6 16. Ng5 Nxe3 17. Nxe6 fxe6
18. Nxe3 c4 19. Qh5 Qc7 20. Ng4 Rf8 21. Re2 Rad8 22. Rd1 Rxd1+ 23. Bxd1 Rd8
24. Bc2 b4 { by ucinne celilo 25.Vd2!, slabsie } (24… Nc6 $142 $11) 25.
cxb4 $6 (25. Rd2 $1 $14 { [%csl Re5] }) 25… Nc6 26. Ba4 Nxb4 27. Qxe5 Qe7
$36 { Anand,V (2783)-Nakamura,H (2775)/ Stavanger/2013/ Nakamura went on to
win an impressive game. }) 13… Nc6 14. dxc5 dxc5 15. a4 Rb8 16. axb5 axb5
17. c4 Nb4 (17… b4 18. Ba4 Bd7 $11) (17… Nd4 18. cxb5 Ba5 $5 $132) 18.
cxb5 Bd7 19. Nc4 Bxb5 20. Nfd2 Bc7 21. Ra3 Bxc4 (21… Qe7 $5 $11) 22. Nxc4
Qxd1 23. Bxd1 Nxe4 24. Ra7 Nd6 $6 (24… Nd5 25. Bf3 Nxe3 26. fxe3 Nd6 $11
{ still holds the balance }) 25. Ba4 Rec8 26. Nxe5 Nb5 27. Bxb5 Rxb5 28.
Bd2 Nc2 29. Nc6 $1 $36 { Ponomariov,R (2733)-Caruana,F (2772)/Zug/ 2013/ })
9… Rb8 10. Na3 O-O 11. axb5 axb5 12. Nxb5 Bg4 13. Bc2 exd4 ( { Black
doesn’t trust the positions after } 13… Bxf3 14. gxf3 Nh5 15. f4 {
anymore. }) 14. Nbxd4 Nxd4 15. cxd4 Re8 ( { Nakamura’s idea, but even after
the older } 15… Bxf3 16. gxf3 Nh5 17. Kh1 Qf6 18. Be3 Ra8 19. Rxa8 Rxa8
20. Rg1 Nf4 21. Bb3 Ne6 22. Bxe6 { the novelty } 22… Qxe6 $5 { promises
Black sufficient compensation and counterplay after } 23. d5 Qf6 24. Qe2
Bxe3 25. fxe3 h6 26. Rc1 Rb8 27. Rc3 Ra8 { 1/2, Craciunescu,V
(2513)-Parushev,A (2259)/corr/2011/ }) 16. Re1 Bxf3 17. gxf3 Nh5 18. Ba4 $5
(18. f4 Qh4 19. Ra3 Nxf4 20. Rg3 Qf6 21. Qf3 Nd5 22. Ba4 Qxf3 23. Rxf3 Re7
24. Bd2 Nf6 25. e5 dxe5 26. dxe5 Nd7 $11 { Leko,P (2735)-Nakamura, H
(2769)/Wijk aan Zee/2013/ }) 18… Rf8 (18… Re6 $142 $5 19. Kh1 Qh4 {
seems more critical }) 19. Bc6 Qf6 20. Ra4 Nf4 21. Kh1 d5 22. exd5 Ng6 23.
Re4 Ne7 24. Rc4 Qd6 25. Bf4 Qd8 26. Bg5 f6 27. Bf4 Nxd5 28. Bxd5+ Qxd5 29.
Qe2 $14 { Grischuk,A (2779)-Nakamura,H (2775)/Thessaloniki/2013/ Although
at this point White’s extra pawn doesn’t play a decisive role, Black is the
one who must fight for a draw – and he didn’t manage to hold the position
after protracted defence. }) ( { Although Nakamura hasn’t tried the text
move yet, he has already employed the similar } 3… Nge7 4. Nc3 $5 (4. O-O
g6 5. c3 a6 6. Ba4 Bg7 7. d4 { is a line, which could arise also in the
game – we will have a closer look at it below. }) 4… d6 ( { But } 4… g6
{ is rather unpleasant for Black\; } 5. d4 exd4 6. Nd5 $5 Bg7 7. Bg5 h6 8.
Bf6 Bxf6 9. Nxf6+ Kf8 10. O-O Kg7 11. Nd5 d6 12. Bxc6 Nxc6 13. Nxd4 Re8 14.
Nb5 Rxe4 15. Nbxc7 $14 { Svidler,P (2750) -Aronian,L (2782)/Nice rpd/2010/
}) 5. d4 a6 6. Be2 $5 (6. Bc4 b5 7. Be2 exd4 8. Nd5 Ne5 9. Qxd4 c5 10. Qd1
Nxd5 11. Qxd5 Be6 12. Qd1 Be7 13. O-O O-O 14. c3 Qb6 15. Ng5 Bc8 16. Qc2
Bb7 17. Rd1 Rad8 18. Nf3 Ng6 19. a4 Bc6 20. axb5 axb5 21. Be3 Rfe8 $11 {
Dominguez Perez,L (2725)-Nakamura,H (2783)/London/2012/ Black has
comfortable equality here and got into trouble only later by trying too
hard. }) 6… exd4 7. Nxd4 Nxd4 8. Qxd4 Nc6 9. Qe3 g6 10. Qg5 h6 11. Qg3
Be6 (11… Bg7 $142) 12. O-O Ne7 $6 13. Be3 Bg7 14. Rad1 (14. f4 $5) 14…
Qd7 15. Bd4 Bxd4 16. Rxd4 O-O-O 17. b4 Qc6 (17… Nc6 $5) 18. Rfd1 g5 19.
a4 Ng6 20. Bf1 Ne5 { Kasimdzhanov,R (2709)-Nakamura,H (2767)/Zug/2013/ }
21. b5 $40) 4. O-O (4. c3 a6 5. Ba4 Bg7 (5… d6 6. d4 Bd7 7. O-O Bg7 { is
the Deferred Steinitz from the previous note }) 6. d4 exd4 7. cxd4 b5 8.
Bb3 Nge7 { gives White the interesting extra option } 9. d5 $5 (9. O-O {
can transpose from 4.0-0. }) 9… Na5 10. Bd2 c5 $5 { Probably the best. }
(10… Bxb2 $2 11. Bxa5 Bxa1 12. Nc3 Bxc3+ (12… Bb2 $2 13. Qc2 $1 Ba3 14.
Nb1 Bd6 15. e5 $18) 13. Bxc3 Rf8 14. Ng5 $40) (10… Nxb3 11. Qxb3 O-O 12.
Bc3 d6 13. Bxg7 Kxg7 14. O-O Bd7 15. Nc3 Rb8 16. Qb4 Re8 17. Rac1 Ng8 18.
Rfe1 $14 { Duda,J (2380)-Dragun,K (2420)/Warsaw/ 2012/ }) 11. d6 Nec6 12.
Bc3 O-O 13. Bd5 Bb7 14. Qd2 (14. O-O $5 $14 { seems more flexible }) 14…
Nb4 15. Bxb7 Nxb7 16. O-O Nc6 17. Bxg7 Kxg7 18. Nc3 b4 19. Na4 Qa5 20. b3
c4 21. Qe3 { Ponomariov,R (2734)-Blagojevic,D (2514)/ Istanbul olm/2012/ }
21… Rae8 $5 $132 { /\ } 22. Nb6 Nxd6 23. Nxd7 Rxe4 24. Qd2 Rd8 $1 25.
Qxd6 Re6 $11 { [%csl Rd7] /=/+ }) (4. d4 exd4 5. Bg5 Be7 6. Bxe7 Qxe7 7.
Bxc6 dxc6 8. Qxd4 Nf6 9. Nc3 Bg4 10. O-O-O Bxf3 11. gxf3 O-O 12. Qe3 (12.
f4 Nh5 13. f5 Rfe8 14. Qe3 Qe5 15. Rd7 $6 Nf6 16. f4 Qxf5 17. exf5 Rxe3 18.
Rxc7 Rb8 $15 { Volokitin,A (2558)-Malaniuk,V (2556)/Warsaw rpd/2002/ })
12… Rfe8 13. f4 Rad8 14. f5 a5 15. Rxd8 Qxd8 16. f4 b5 $6 (16… Nd5 $5
17. Nxd5 Qxd5 18. exd5 Rxe3 19. dxc6 bxc6 $132) 17. Rd1 Qc8 $6 18. Qd4 Nh5
19. fxg6 hxg6 20. f5 b4 21. Na4 $40 { Gopal,G (2604)-Sokolov,I
(2654)/Sarajevo/2010/ }) 4… Bg7 5. c3 a6 6. Bxc6 $5 { A rare move, which
Anand played very fast. White obviously wants to avoid the following
unclear modern line, but the position he is heading for is no less complex
in a strategic sense. } (6. Ba4 Nge7 7. d4 exd4 8. cxd4 b5 9. Bb3 (9. Bc2
O-O ( { White has to reckon with } 9… d5 $5 10. exd5 Nb4 $132 { as well.
}) 10. d5 Na5 11. Nc3 (11. a4 b4 12. Nbd2 d6 13. Nb3 c5 14. Nxa5 Qxa5 15.
Nd2 Qd8 16. Nc4 a5 17. Re1 Ba6 18. Bb3 Nc8 19. Rb1 { Palac,M
(2475)-Arkhipov,S (2500)/ Kecskemet/1991/ } 19… Bxc4 20. Bxc4 Nb6 21. Bb5
c4 $132) 11… d6 { gives White an extra tempo compared to 9.Bb3. However,
it’s still not easy to prove an unequivocal advantage: } 12. Nd4 Bb7 13.
Rb1 c5 14. dxc6 Naxc6 15. Nxc6 Nxc6 16. Be3 Rc8 17. a4 Nb4 18. Bb3 bxa4 19.
Bxa4 d5 20. exd5 Nxd5 21. Nxd5 Qxd5 22. Qxd5 Bxd5 $11 { Brodsky,M
(2545)-Murey,J (2440)/Rishon Le Ziyyon/1998/ }) 9… O-O 10. Nc3 Na5 (10…
d6 { allows } 11. Nd5 $5 { [%cal Yc1g5] } 11… h6 12. Nxe7+ Nxe7 13. Be3
Kh7 14. Rc1 f5 15. Qd3 $1 $16 { [%csl Rc7,Rh7] /\ } 15… Bb7 $4 16. Ng5+
$1 hxg5 17. Bxg5 d5 18. exd5 $18 { [%cal Rd3h3,Rd5d6] }) 11. Bc2 d6 12. h3
(12. d5 Nc4 13. Re1 c5 14. dxc6 Nxc6 15. Rb1 h6 16. Nd5 Be6 17. b3 N4e5 18.
Nxe5 dxe5 19. Ba3 Re8 20. Bc5 Rc8 21. b4 Nd4 $11 { Karjakin,S
(2723)-Aronian,L (2786)/ Moscow blitz/2009/ }) 12… c5 { A more testing
move is } 13. Bg5 $5 (13. dxc5 dxc5 14. Qxd8 Rxd8 15. Be3 Nb7 16. e5 Bf5
17. Be4 (17. Ne4 Nd5 18. Bg5 Re8 19. g4 Bd7 20. Nf6+ $6 Bxf6 21. exf6 Nb4
22. Bd1 Bc6 $15 { Smeets,J (2651)-Karjakin, S (2725)/Nice rpd
blindfold/2010/ }) 17… Bxe4 18. Nxe4 Rd5 19. Bg5 Nc6 20. Nf6+ Bxf6 21.
Bxf6 { Smeets,J (2651)-Aronian,L (2782)/Nice rpd blindfold/2010/ } 21… c4
$1 { [%cal Yb7c5,Yc5d3] } 22. Rad1 Nb4 $15) 13… h6 14. Bh4 g5 15. Bg3
cxd4 $5 (15… Nc4 16. b3 Na3 17. Bd3 Nc6 18. Nd5 Nxd4 19. Nxd4 Bxd4 20.
Qh5 Kg7 $5 (20… Bg7 $6 21. Rad1 c4 22. Be2 c3 23. Nxc3 Bxc3 24. Bxd6 $16
{ Polgar,J (2710)-Banusz,T (2563)/Warsaw rpd/2011/ }) 21. Rad1 Be6 22. Kh1
{ [%cal Yf2f4] /\ } 22… Ra7 $6 23. f4 f6 24. e5 $1 Bxd5 25. fxg5 $40) 16.
Nxd4 Nc4 17. Rb1 Re8 $1 $132 { A.Kuzmin } (17… Bb7 18. Nd5 Bxd5 19. exd5
Qb6 20. Qd3 Rfe8 21. Rfd1 Bxd4 22. Qxd4 Qxd4 23. Rxd4 Rac8 24. Re1 Kg7 25.
Bd3 $14 { Gopal,G (2584)-Nezad,H (2408)/Caleta/2010/ })) (6. Bc4 Nge7 7. d4
exd4 8. cxd4 b5 { leads to the same position after the natural } 9. Bb3 O-O
) 6… dxc6 7. d4 { Logical central play. } (7. d3 { is too tame: } 7…
Ne7 8. h3 c5 9. Na3 Nc6 10. Bg5 Qd7 11. Qd2 O-O 12. Rfe1 b6 13. Rad1 Bb7
14. Nc4 f6 15. Bh6 Qf7 16. Bxg7 Kxg7 17. b3 Rfe8 18. Nh2 Rad8 19. f4 b5 20.
Nb2 f5 $5 $132 { Zagrebelny,S (2510)-Margolin,B (2385)/Alushta/ 1994/ })
7… exd4 { A natural reaction. } (7… Bg4 $143 8. dxe5 Qxd1 9. Rxd1 Bxe5
10. Na3 Bxf3 11. gxf3 b5 12. Nc2 $14 { leads to an inferior endgame: }
12… Ne7 13. Be3 g5 14. Bc5 Rg8 15. h3 Rg6 16. a4 Bd6 $6 17. Bxd6 Rxd6 18.
Rxd6 cxd6 19. axb5 cxb5 20. Nd4 { [%csl Rb5] } 20… Kd7 21. Ra2 $14 {
/+/-, Stanojoski,Z (2450) -Mitkov,M (2398)/Struga/2005/ }) 8. cxd4 Ne7 9.
h3 { Although the text move has still been played, we are gradually
entering less charted waters. } (9. Nc3 Bg4 $5 (9… O-O 10. Be3 h6 11. Qb3
b6 12. d5 $6 (12. Ne5 $5 c5 13. Rad1 $14) 12… cxd5 13. exd5 Nf5 14. Bf4
g5 15. Be5 Nh4 16. Nxh4 $6 (16. Bxg7 Nxf3+ 17. gxf3 Kxg7 18. Rad1 $13)
16… Bxe5 17. Nf3 Bg7 18. Rfe1 Bb7 19. Rad1 Re8 20. Rxe8+ Qxe8 21. h4 g4
22. Nh2 { Abergel,T (2517)-Kosten,A (2497)/Nimes/2009/ } 22… g3 $36 {
[%csl Gb7,Gg7] }) 10. Be3 O-O 11. h3 Bxf3 12. Qxf3 f5 (12… Bxd4 13. Rad1
c5 14. b4 Qe8 (14… b6 15. bxc5 bxc5 16. Na4 $16) 15. Bxd4 cxd4 16. Rxd4
$14) 13. Bg5 Qd7 (13… fxe4 $142 $1 14. Qxe4 Rf7 15. Rfe1 Qd7 $11 { /=/+ }
16. Bxe7 $6 Re8) 14. Bxe7 (14. e5 $5) 14… Qxe7 15. e5 Rad8 16. Rad1 c5
17. Nd5 Qf7 18. dxc5 Bxe5 19. Rfe1 Rde8 { 1/2, Chandler,M (2535)-Spassky,B
(2610)/Vienna/1986/ }) 9… O-O 10. Nc3 h6 { [%csl Gc8,Gd4,Ge4,Gg7][%cal
Yc8e6,Yf7f5] Patiently prepares Be6, or f5. Although White has a mobile
pawn centre, the position is not fully clear, as advancing the pawns could
enhance the strength of Black’s bishop pair. } 11. Qb3 $146 { An
interesting novelty, which complicates Black’s development. } (11. Be3 f5 (
11… Be6 $5) 12. Qd2 $2 (12. Qb3+ Kh8 $13) 12… fxe4 13. Nxe4 { Cuartas,J
(2517)-Panesso Rivera,H (2335)/Pamplona/2012/ } 13… Rxf3 $1 14. gxf3 Nf5
$40) ( { A possibly promising alternative is } 11. Bf4 $5 { [%cal Yf4e5] })
11… g5 $5 { A dynamic and provocative reaction. } (11… Qd6 { also
prevents Bf4, but Black lacks other active ideas after } 12. Rd1 { Nakamura
seeks more direct counterplay. }) 12. Rd1 (12. Be3 { is somewhat more
flexible, as White has no better square for his bishop, while his rooks
might still be deployed differently. }) 12… b6 { [%csl Rc6] A calm and
slow move, which nevertheless has a drawback – c6 becomes potentially
vulnerable. } ( { Engines recommend the straightforward } 12… Be6 $5 13.
d5 (13. Qxb7 a5 { [%cal Rd8d7, Rf8b8] } 14. d5 $8 cxd5 15. exd5 Rb8 16. Qa7
Nxd5 17. Qxa5 c6 $44 { [%csl Ge6, Gg7] }) 13… cxd5 14. exd5 Bf5 15. Qxb7
(15. Be3 g4 $5 $132) 15… Qd6 16. Qb3 Rab8 17. Qc4 Rfe8 $32 { ~~ Black has
good compensation for the sacrificed pawn, but it’s still not easy to opt
for such a radical solution. }) 13. a4 { In a distant endgame the insertion
of a4 and a5 can be advantageous for White, but it doesn’t substantially
improve his chances in a complex middlegame. } (13. Qc2 { [%cal Gc2c6]
allows } 13… f5 $132) ( { More logical was } 13. Be3 Qd6 (13… Be6 14.
d5 $36) 14. Rac1 $14 { [%cal Yd4d5,Yh3h4] It seems that White is slightly
better, future active plans can be well timed pawn advances as d5, or h4. }
) 13… a5 14. Be3 Ng6 { Risky, Black leaves Pc6 unattended. } (14… Qd6
$5 { [%cal Yd6b4,Yd6g6] deserves attention, the queen aims for g6, or even
b4. After } 15. d5 g4 $132 { the position remains very unclear. }) 15. d5 {
Stabilising the centre, but Black is ideally placed to control the
e5-square. } ( { More dangerous for Black was } 15. Ne2 $142 $1 $14 { [%cal
Ye2g3,Yg3h5,Ya1c1,Gc1c7] /\ } 15… Qf6 16. Qc2 Bxh3 17. Ne5 $1 $36) 15…
c5 16. Nb5 g4 $5 { Just as in move 11, a very dynamic and concrete
continuation. } (16… Ba6 17. d6 (17. Nd2 Qd7 $11) 17… Bxb5 18. dxc7
Qxc7 19. Qxb5 Rfd8 $132 { is roughly balanced – Black’s active pieces
compensate for the holes in his pawn structure. Nakamura is more ambitious.
}) 17. hxg4 Bxg4 18. Bd2 { A safe move. } (18. d6 Bxf3 19. gxf3 (19. dxc7
$2 Qh4 20. gxf3 Qh3 $19) 19… Qf6 (19… Qh4 $5 20. Kg2 (20. Kf1 Ne5 $132)
20… Qf6 21. dxc7 Nh4+ 22. Kf1 Qxf3 $11 { is similar to the main line. })
20. dxc7 Qxf3 { [%csl Gc7,Rg1] gives White a powerful passed pawn, but his
king is very exposed. An unforced sample line is } 21. Qd5 Nh4 22. Kf1 Rae8
23. Nd6 Re6 24. c8=Q Rxc8 25. Nxc8 Rxe4 26. Nd6 Qg2+ 27. Ke2 Qf3+ $11 { /\
} 28. Kd2 $4 Rd4+ $19) (18. Bc1 { is a computer idea, but it’s not without
risk – White can miss the Ra1 on the kingside: } 18… Nh4 (18… Qd7 $5
19. d6 c6 20. Nc7 Rab8 $13) 19. Nxh4 Qxh4 (19… Bxd1 $2 20. Qg3 $18 {
[%cal Rc1h6,Rh4f5] }) 20. Re1 (20. f3 Qg3 21. Qe3 Bd7 22. Qf2 Qxf2+ 23.
Kxf2 Bxb5 24. axb5 f5 $11) 20… Be5 21. g3 Qh5 22. Ra3 $1 $13) 18… Qd7
$1 { A good positional move, preparing c6. } (18… Ne5 19. Nxe5 Bxe5 (
19… Bxd1 $2 20. Qg3 $18 { [%cal Ra1d1,Rd2h6,Re5c6] }) 20. f3 Bh5 21. Bxh6
Qh4 22. Qe3 $1 $14) (18… Nh4 19. Nxh4 Qxh4 20. f3 (20. Re1 $5 { [%cal
Yd2c3,Yd2f4] might be even stronger }) 20… Bd7 21. Bc3 $14) 19. Rac1 $6 {
Loses a tempo } ( { A more useful move was } 19. Re1 $142 $5 { /\ } 19…
c6 20. dxc6 Qxc6 21. Nh2 (21. Bc3 Bxf3 22. Bxg7 Nh4 $5 23. gxf3 Kxg7 24.
Kf1 $11) 21… Be6 22. Qc2 $13 { [%cal Yd2c3] }) 19… c6 { Direct, but
Black could also have played } (19… Rad8 $5) ( { , or } 19… Rfe8 20.
Re1 c6 $15) 20. dxc6 (20. Na3 Rfe8 $5 21. Nc4 Rab8 $36 { and White has no
obvious way to advantageously retain the central tension. }) 20… Qxc6 21.
Bc3 $6 { This could have cost White an exchange. } (21. Qe3 $142 Rfe8 22.
Re1 Bxb2 23. Rb1 Bg7 24. Bc3 $15 { /<=> Black’s extra pawn doesn’t play a
major role yet and White has counterplay. }) 21… Bxf3 22. gxf3 Rad8 $5 {
Nakamura plays for a strategic advantage. } (22… Nf4 $1 { with the forced
follow-up } 23. Rd6 Qc8 24. Bd2 Ne2+ 25. Kg2 Nxc1 26. Bxc1 { nets Black an
exchange. Not a difficult line to calculate, but the evaluation of the
final position is not so simple. Nevertheless it seems Black has reasonable
winning chances after } 26… Rd8 27. Qd5 $5 (27. Rxb6 c4 $17) 27… Rb8
28. Bxh6 Rxd6 29. Qxd6 Bxh6 30. Qxh6 Qe6 $15 { /-/+ }) 23. Rxd8 (23. Bxg7
$2 { runs into } 23… Nf4 24. Nd6 { The beautiful point is } 24… Rxd6 $1
(24… Kxg7 25. Qc3+ f6 (25… Kh7 $2 26. Qf6 Ne2+ 27. Kf1 Nxc1 28. Rd5 $18
) 26. Nf5+ $132) (24… Ne2+ 25. Kg2 Nxc1 26. Qc3 Rxd6 27. Rxd6 Qxd6 28.
Bxf8 Qg6+ 29. Kf1 Na2 30. Qc4 $11) 25. Bxf8 Rd2 $3 (25… Rxd1+ $2 26. Rxd1
$16) 26. Kh1 $8 (26. Rxd2 Qg6+ 27. Kf1 Qg2+ 28. Ke1 Qg1#) 26… Qd7 27.
Rg1+ Kxf8 28. Rg3 (28. Rg4 Nd3 $19 { is similar }) 28… Qd8 $1 29. Rg4 Nd3
$19 { Black wins all the material back with interest and a continuing
attack. }) 23… Rxd8 24. Rd1 Rd7 $15 { Fights for the open file, but Black
had also the simple } (24… Rxd1+ 25. Qxd1 Bxc3 26. bxc3 (26. Nxc3 Nf4 $36
) 26… Qf6 $15 { The distant passed Ph6 gives him an advantage in almost
any endgame. }) 25. Rxd7 Qxd7 26. Qd5 $6 { Transposing to a knight endgame
only increases Black’s advantage. } (26. Bxg7 $142 Kxg7 27. Qc3+ f6 28. Qe3
Qh3 29. Nd6 Nh4 (29… Ne5 30. Nf5+ $11 { [%cal Yf5g3] }) 30. Nf5+ Nxf5 31.
exf5 Qxf5 32. Qe7+ Kg6 33. Qe8+ Kg5 { doesn’t lead to a perpetual, but
after } 34. Kg2 $15 { Black faces a very tough technical task. }) 26…
Qxd5 27. exd5 Bxc3 28. bxc3 Ne5 $6 (28… Kf8 $142 $1 { is more flexible
and stronger, after the analogous } 29. Nd6 { Black’s knight has an
alternative route } 29… Nf4 $1 30. c4 Ne2+ 31. Kf1 Nc3 $19 { [%csl
Ga5,Gh6][%cal Rc3a4] }) 29. Nd6 Kf8 30. Kh2 $2 { White was fighting for a
draw and decentralising the king doesn’t feel right, moreover it fails
tactically. } ( { It is probably insufficient to play } 30. Kf1 b5 $1 (
30… Ke7 31. Nc8+ Kd7 32. Nxb6+ Kc7 33. f4 $11 { already works, as Black
doesn’t have the manoeuvre from the game. }) (30… Nxf3 31. Ke2 Ne5 32. f4
$44 { allows White to achieve full coordination with excellent drawing
chances. }) 31. Nxb5 (31. axb5 a4 32. Nb7 a3 33. Nxc5 a2 34. Nb3 Ke7 $19 {
[%csl Ga2,Rb5,Rd5,Gh6][%cal Ye7d6] and White’s pawns are blockaded, while
Black’s will decide. }) 31… Nc4 $17 { [%cal Rc4b6,Rb6a4] Black will take
the Pa4, transfer his knight to d6 and support one of his passed pawns with
his king – he should win this in the long run. }) ( { It seems that the
best try was } 30. f4 Nd3 31. Nc8 Nxf4 32. Nxb6 (32. c4 Ke8 33. Nxb6 Kd8
34. d6 Ne6 35. Kg2 Ng7 36. Kh3 Ne8 37. d7 Nf6 38. Kh4 Ke7 $1 $17 { and
Black takes on d7 only after White moves his Pf2 }) 32… Ke7 33. Kf1 h5
34. d6+ Kxd6 35. Nc4+ { although even here } 35… Kc7 $5 (35… Ke6 36.
Nxa5 Nd5 37. Nb7 c4 38. Nd8+ Kf6 39. Nb7 Nxc3 40. Nd6 $15) 36. Nxa5 Nd5 37.
Nb3 Kd6 $17 { gives Black good winning chances. }) 30… Ke7 $1 31. Nc8+ (
31. Nf5+ Kd7 32. Nxh6 b5 33. axb5 a4 34. Nf5 a3 35. Ne3 Nxf3+ 36. Kg3 Ne1
$19 { [%csl Ga3][%cal Ga3a1] }) 31… Kd7 32. Nxb6+ Kc7 33. f4 Nf3+ 34. Kg2
Nd2 $1 $19 { [%csl Rb6] } 35. Na8+ Kb7 36. d6 { White must ditch the passed
pawn for free to save his knight, the resulting endgame is hopeless. }
36… Kc6 37. Nc7 Kxd6 38. Nb5+ Kd5 39. Kg3 Kc4 (39… Nc4 $1 $19 { [%csl
Ra4][%cal Rc4b6] is simpler }) 40. Nd6+ (40. f3 f6 $5 41. f5 Nb1 42. Nd6+
Kd3 43. Ne4 c4 44. Nxf6 Nxc3 45. Nd7 Nd5 { /\ } 46. f6 Nxf6 $1 47. Nxf6 c3
$19) 40… Kxc3 41. Nxf7 c4 ( { An easier win was } 41… Kd4 $1 42. Nd6 (
42. f5 c4 $19 { transposes to the game }) 42… Ne4+ 43. Nxe4 Kxe4 44. Kg4
c4 45. f5 Ke5 $19 ( { , or } 45… h5+ 46. Kg5 c3 47. f6 c2 48. f7 c1=Q+))
42. f5 (42. Nd6 $5 { is better, but also loses by force to } 42… Kd3 $1
43. f5 (43. Nb5 c3 $19) 43… c3 44. f6 c2 45. f7 c1=Q 46. f8=Q Qg1+ 47.
Kh3 (47. Kh4 Qh2+ 48. Kg4 Qg2+ 49. Kh4 Nf3+ $19) 47… Qh1+ 48. Kg3 Nf1+
49. Kf4 Qh2+ 50. Kg4 Qg2+ 51. Kh4 Qg5+ 52. Kh3 Qh5+ 53. Kg2 Qh2+ $1 54. Kf3
(54. Kxf1 Qh1#) 54… Nd2+ 55. Kg4 Qg2+ $19 { – White gets mated, or loses
his queen. }) 42… Kd4 43. Nd6 ( { As } 43. f6 { fails to } 43… Ne4+ { ,
Black’s win is already trivial. }) 43… Ke5 44. Nb5 Kxf5 45. f3 h5 0-1

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So as to rank gamers, FIDE, ICCF, and national chess companies use the Elo rating program formulated by Arpad Elo. Elo is actually a statistical procedure based on the assumption which the chess performance of each player in her or his game titles is usually a random variable. Arpad Elo thought of a player's correct ability as the common of that player's overall performance random variable, and showed the best way to estimate the average from outcomes of player's games. The US Chess Federation applied Elo's ideas in 1960, as well as the program speedily received recognition as currently being equally fairer and even more accurate than older units; it was adopted by FIDE in 1970.
Distinct designs or strategic themes will typically crop up from unique groups of openings which end in a specific type of pawn construction. An case in point will be the minority assault, which can be the assault of queenside pawns against an opponent that has a lot more pawns to the queenside.
Couple of chess supporters or pundits gave Sergey Karjakin much prospect of profitable the match in Big apple, although the Russian once again demonstrated the solid nerves and tenacity that experienced observed him earn the 2015 World Cup as well as 2016 Candidates Tournament to qualify for the match.
With huge databases of previous games and significant analytical means, personal computers might help gamers to find out chess and prepare for matches. Net Chess Servers permit persons to discover website and Perform opponents all over the world.
Within this guide, a must for all severe chessplayers, Kasparov analyses deeply Karpov's best video games and assesses the legacy of the good Russian genius.
Right until about 1980, virtually all English language chess publications utilized a sort of descriptive notation. In descriptive notation, files are named based on the piece which occupies the back rank Firstly of the game, and each sq. has two diverse names based on whether it's from White's or Black's standpoint.
For the age of 7, he started off showing his fascination in chess immediately after watching his father Henrik and eldest sister Ellen Carlsen chess matches in the house.
ПША не смогла обеспечить поддержку спонсоров, поэтому следующий матч на первенство мира состоялся только через пять лет, но в это время Каспаров не сидел, сложа руки.
Alternatively, if both equally gamers nevertheless Possess a knight There's a extremely not likely still theoretical possibility of checkmate, so this rule would not implement.