Chess PGN Game Match played Artur Jussupow vs Rainer Polzin- in Bundesliga 0506, Open: King’s Indian – fianchetto without c4

Chess PGN Game Match played Artur Jussupow vs Rainer Polzin- in Bundesliga 0506, Open: King's Indian - fianchetto without c4


Match between Artur Jussupow and Rainer Polzin

Event: Bundesliga 0506

Variation: King’s Indian – fianchetto without c4

Eco code: A49

Pgn File:


[Event “Bundesliga 0506”]
[Site “Germany”]
[Date “2006.02.19”]
[Round “11.1”]
[White “Jussupow, Artur”]
[Black “Polzin, Rainer”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[WhiteElo “2595”]
[BlackElo “2514”]
[ECO “A49”]
[Annotator “Hazai,L”]
[EventDate “2005.10.21”]
[PlyCount “101”]
[EventType “team-tourn”]
[EventRounds “15”]
[EventCountry “GER”]
[Source “ChessBase”]
[SourceDate “2006.06.07”]
[WhiteTeam “Solingen”]
[BlackTeam “Neukoelln”]
[WhiteTeamCountry “GER”]
[BlackTeamCountry “GER”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. Nf3 g6 3. g3 Bg7 4. Bg2 O-O 5. O-O d6 6. b3 { This quiet
positional system is not without venom, but certainly 6.c4 is more
promising… } 6… e5 7. dxe5 dxe5 { Black doesn’t want to complicate
matters, his aim is a safe equalization. } (7… Nfd7 { –
Dizdarevich-Armanda, Solin/Split 2003 CBM 99 }) 8. Ba3 $1 Qxd1 (8… Re8 $5
{ deserves attention as well. } 9. Nc3 (9. Qxd8 Rxd8 10. Nc3 Nc6 (10… Re8
11. Rad1 c6 12. Ng5 { /\ Nge4 >< d6 } 12... Bf5 13. Nge4 (13. e4 { restricts only the white pieces. } 13... Bg4 14. Rd3 h6 15. Nf3 Na6 16. h3 Bxf3 17. Bxf3 Bf8 18. Bxf8 Kxf8 $11 { A.Martin-W.Watson, Walsall 1992 }) 13... Nxe4 14. Nxe4 Bxe4 15. Bxe4 { White has the ^^, the d <-> and the
better developed pieces. } 15… Na6 16. Rd7 $14) 11. Rad1 Bf5 $11 {
quickly finishing the development, Koneru-McNab, Hampstead 2001. }) 9…
Nc6 10. Ng5 { The d6 square is not weak this time! } 10… Bf5 11. Nge4
Nxe4 12. Nxe4 Qxd1 13. Rfxd1 Nd4 $11 { Ekstrom-Gallaghe kstrom-Gallagher,
Swiss chT 1994 }) 9. Rxd1 Re8 10. Nc3 (10. Bb2 $143 { allows Black to
finish his development without any problems. } 10… e4 (10… Nc6 11. Na3
e4 12. Nd4 Nxd4 13. Bxd4 b6 14. c4 Bb7 15. Nc2 Rad8 $11 { Rodgaard-Hazai,
Copenhagen 1987 }) 11. Ne5 Ng4 { is more active! } (11… Nbd7 12. Nc4 Nc5
13. Nba3 Be6 14. Bd4 b6 $11 { Navarovszky-Lilienthal, Balatonfured 1960 }))
10… e4 (10… Bd7 $2 { founders on the tactical blow } 11. Nxe5 $1 Rxe5
12. Bxb7 Bc6 13. Bxa8 Bxa8 14. Rd8+ Re8 15. Rad1 $16 { Kholmov-Khasin,
Moscow 1957 }) (10… Na6 11. Nd2 e4 12. Nc4 Rb8 13. Bb2 b6 14. Nb5 $5 (14.
Nd5 { leads only to unnecessary exchanges. } 14… Nxd5 15. Bxg7 Kxg7 16.
Rxd5 Be6 17. Rd4 f5 18. Ne3 Rbd8 19. Rad1 Rxd4 20. Rxd4 Nb8 $11 {
Cigan-Groszpeter, Austria 1995 })) 11. Nd4 $6 (11. Ne1 $2 { The N is really
outplaced here. } 11… c6 12. Rab1 Nbd7 13. Bh3 Nb6 14. Bxc8 Raxc8 $15 {
Barcza-Szabo, Budapest 1961 }) (11. Nd2 Nc6 $5 (11… e3 { corrupts White’s
P structure, but the lack of development can be fatal. } 12. fxe3 Ng4 13.
Nd5 Nxe3 14. Nxe3 (14. Nxc7 $5) 14… Rxe3 15. Ne4 Nc6 16. Kf2 Bxa1 17.
Kxe3 $14 { Komljenovic-Grigore, Benasque 1999 }) (11… Na6 { – 10…Na6 })
) 11… e3 (11… c6 { depriving the knights from their penetration
squares. } 12. e3 (12. f3 Nbd7 (12… Na6 $5 { looks more active. }) 13.
Nxe4 Nxe4 14. fxe4 c5 { Black wins the exchange, but loses the fight for
the development. } 15. Nb5 Bxa1 16. Rxa1 Rb8 17. Rd1 b6 18. Bb2 $44 {
Alvarez Ibarra-Grigore, Benasque 1999 }) 12… Nbd7 13. h3 (13. Rd2 Nb6 {
is probably an easier way for development. } (13… Nf8 14. Rad1 h5 15. h3
N8h7 16. Kh2 Ng5 17. Na4 Nd7 18. Nc5 Nxc5 19. Bxc5 $14 { Pomar
Salamanca-Keene, Caorle 1972 }) 14. h3 Bd7 15. Rad1 Rad8) (13. g4 h6 14. h3
Nf8 (14… Nb6 $5 { is again the alternative. }) 15. Rd2 N8h7 16. Rad1 Ng5
$13 { Danielsen-Schandorff, Tonder 1993 }) 13… Nf8 (13… Nb6 { /\ Bd7,
Rad8 neutralizing the pressure on the d <->. }) 14. Rd2 h5 $5 { /\ N8h7-g5
} (14… h6 15. Rad1 N8h7 16. Nce2 (16. Na4 $5 Ng5 17. Kh2) 16… Ng5 17.
Nf4 h5 18. c4 Nd7 19. h4 Nh7 20. Nde2 Nhf8 21. Bd6 Nf6 22. Bh3 Ng4 23. Bg2
Nf6 24. Bh3 Ng4 25. Bg2 Nf6 { 1/2-1/2 E.Cosma-Sziva, Istanbul 2000 })) (
11… a6 { Black doesn’t want to weaken the d6 square. } 12. e3 Nbd7 13.
Bb2 (13. Na4 b5 14. Nc5 Nxc5 15. Bxc5 Nd7 $17 { I.Cosma-Navrotescu, Baile
Tusnad 2001 }) 13… b6 14. a4 Bb7 15. Rd2 (15. b4 { weakening >< c4. } 15... Ne5 $36 { Pomar Salamanca-Unzicker, Haifa 1976 }) 15... Ne5 16. Rad1 Rad8 $13) 12. fxe3 $6 (12. f4 $5 c6 $13) 12... c6 { Now White's P structure is vulnerable, and he cannot find a real target for his better developed pieces. } 13. Rd3 Ng4 (13... Nbd7) 14. Nd1 Nd7 15. c3 (15. h3 Nge5 16. Rd2 Nf6) 15... Nde5 16. Rd2 Bh6 17. Nc2 { White's pieces become extremely passive defending the weak e3 P. } 17... Bf5 18. h3 Bxc2 19. Rxc2 Nxe3 20. Nxe3 Bxe3+ { Black has won back the P with a better position, the ^^ has no future, but the structural weaknesses remain. } 21. Kh2 Rad8 22. c4 h5 ( 22... f5 { immediately looks more flexible. }) 23. Rf1 f5 (23... Kg7 24. Bb2 Bd4 25. Bc1 { avoiding the good N versus bad B _|_. } 25... f6 26. Rd1) 24. Bb2 Rd7 (24... Bd4 25. Bc1 Nf7 $15 { with an annoying pressure against >< e2. }) 25. Bxe5 Rxe5 { White has still problems in the _|_ R+^-, this type is far from drawish! } 26. b4 Rd2 { Black has no interest in exchanging his active R for White's passive one. } (26... Kg7) 27. Rfc1 f4 (27... h4 { looked more dangerous. } 28. b5 (28. gxh4 $2 Bf4+ 29. Kh1 Rexe2 ) 28... cxb5 29. cxb5 Rxc2 30. Rxc2 Rxb5 31. Rc7 (31. Rc8+ { activates the black K. } 31... Kf7 32. Rc7+ Kf6 33. Rxb7 Ra5 34. Rb2 Bd4 35. Rd2 Be5 $19) 31... Rb2 $17) 28. Bf3 fxg3+ 29. Kg2 (29. Kxg3 { was not the end of the world?! } 29... Rg5+ 30. Kh2 Bf4+ 31. Kh1) 29... Rxc2 (29... Rd7 { keeping the active rooks was logical. } 30. Rb1 h4 31. b5 cxb5 32. cxb5 Kg7 $17) 30. Rxc2 h4 31. Rc3 Bd2 (31... Kf7) 32. Rb3 b6 (32... a6 { allows the exchanges after } 33. b5 axb5 34. cxb5 cxb5 35. Rd3 Be3 36. Rd8+ Kg7 37. Rd7+ Kf6 38. Rxb7) 33. Rb2 Bc3 34. Rb3 Bd4 35. Rd3 c5 36. bxc5 Bxc5 (36... bxc5 37. Rb3) 37. Rd8+ { winning the P, but activating the K. } (37. Rd7) 37... Kg7 38. Rd7+ Kf6 39. Rxa7 Re3 40. Rh7 Kg5 (40... g5 41. Rd7) 41. Rf7 Rc3 42. Be4 Rc1 (42... Rxc4 43. Bd3 Ra4 44. Bb1) 43. Rf1 Rxc4 44. Bd3 Ra4 45. Bb1 Bf2 (45... b5 $1 { and the g6 P can be defended from the sixth rank. } 46. Bd3 b4 47. Rc1 Ra5 48. Rc4 Kh5) 46. Rd1 { /\ Rd6 >< g6 } 46... Rb4 (46... Kf4 47. Rd6 g5 48. Rf6+) (46... Bc5 { was still possible. }) 47. Bd3 Kf6 $2 (47... Ra4 { repeating moves was still possible. }) 48. Rc1 $1 { Now suddenly the black R cannot avoid the exchange, after which the _|_ becomes dead draw! } 48... Bc5 (48... g5 49. Rc4 Rb2 50. Rc2 { with perpetual harrassing! }) 49. Rc4 { and the R cannot escape. } 49... g5 50. Rxb4 Bxb4 51. a4 1/2-1/2

More Like This


Categories


pgn

Leave a Reply