Chess PGN Game Match played Dimitri Reinderman vs Nigel D Short- in Corus-B, Open: Ruy Lopez – exchange, Gligoric variation

Chess PGN Game Match played Dimitri Reinderman vs Nigel D Short- in Corus-B, Open: Ruy Lopez - exchange, Gligoric variation


Match between Dimitri Reinderman and Nigel D Short

Event: Corus-B

Variation: Ruy Lopez – exchange, Gligoric variation

Eco code: C69

Pgn File:


[Event “Corus-B”]
[Site “Wijk aan Zee”]
[Date “2009.01.23”]
[Round “6”]
[White “Reinderman, Dimitri”]
[Black “Short, Nigel D”]
[Result “0-1”]
[WhiteElo “2549”]
[BlackElo “2663”]
[ECO “C69”]
[Annotator “Marin,M”]
[EventDate “2009.01.17”]
[PlyCount “74”]
[EventType “tourn”]
[EventRounds “13”]
[EventCountry “NED”]
[Source “ChessBase”]
[SourceDate “2009.03.25”]
[EventCategory “16”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Bxc6 dxc6 5. O-O f6 { I always have
considered that the line played in this game should be regarded as the
unchallenged main line against the exchange variation. I see no problems
for Black whatsoever and even feel that White should be careful in order to
avoid getting the worse position. I have also recommended and analysed it
in the book Beating the Open Games. For some reasons, players of the
younger generation frequently resort to secondary lines, with variable
success, but Short belongs to the classic already… } (5… Be7 $5 {
Leko,P (2738)-Aronian,L (2761)/Dortmund 2006/CBM 114/ [Marin,M] (1-0, 63) }
) 6. d4 Bg4 (6… exd4 7. Nxd4 c5 { Svidler,P (2735) -Aronian,L
(2750)/Mexico City 2007/CBM 120/[Marin,M] (1/2, 20) }) 7. c3 { This is the
most consistent variation. } ( { The early release of the tension in the
centre offers Black comfortable play. Here is a recent game of mine. } 7.
dxe5 Qxd1 8. Rxd1 fxe5 9. Rd3 Bd6 10. Nbd2 b5 11. b3 Ne7 12. Bb2 Ng6 13. g3
O-O 14. Kg2 Rf6 15. Ng1 Raf8 16. f4 exf4 $1 { Black gets a nice domination
on dark squares, compensating for the exchange. } 17. Bxf6 gxf6 18. Ngf3
Kf7 $1 { [%cal Gf8g8] } 19. a4 Rg8 20. Kf2 { 1/2 Milu,R (2430)-Marin,M
(2552)/Predeal 2006/EXT 2007 } ( { Actually, a more elegant way to force a
draw would be } 20. axb5 Bxf3+ 21. Nxf3 fxg3 22. Rxd6 Nf4+ 23. Kf1 g2+ 24.
Kf2 Nh3+ 25. Ke3 cxd6 26. bxa6 $11) 20… Bc5+ 21. Kf1 Bh3+ (21… fxg3 22.
hxg3 Bd6 $11) 22. Ke2 Bg4 23. Kf1 $11) 7… Bd6 8. Be3 Ne7 9. dxe5 { After
weakening the d3-square, this looks even less recommendable than in the
previous comment. } (9. Nbd2 { is the most consistent continuation. }) 9…
fxe5 10. c4 { The plan initiated by this move usually is carried out after
inserting h2-h3 at some point. } (10. h3 Bh5 11. c4 c5 12. b4 b6 13. bxc5
bxc5 14. Nbd2 O-O 15. Qa4 (15. Rb1 Nc6 $15) 15… Qc8 $1 { [%cal
Gh5f3,Gc8h3,Gf8f3] This move takes full advantage of the weakness induced
by the move h3. The threat of an exchange sacrifice on f3 is entirely real.
} 16. Kh2 (16. Nh2 Qe6 17. Rab1 h6 18. f3 Rfd8 19. Rb2 Bf7 20. Ng4 Ng6 21.
g3 h5 22. Nf2 { Baklan,V (2618)-Kallio,H (2502)/Batumi 2002/CBM 090 (1-0,
39) } 22… h4 $15) 16… Ng6 { Black threatens 17…Bxf3 18.Nxf3 Rxf3
19.gxf3 Nh4 with attack. } 17. g4 Bxg4 $1 18. hxg4 Qxg4 19. Qd1 $6 (19. Rg1
Qh5+ 20. Kg3 Nf4 21. Bxf4 Rxf4 22. Kg2 Rxf3 23. Nxf3 Qg4+ 24. Kf1 Qxf3 $44)
19… Rf5 20. Ng5 Rxg5 21. Qxg4 Rxg4 $17 { Shaw,J (2432)-Ashton,A
(2321)/Gibraltar 2006/CBM 110 ext (1/ 2, 49) }) 10… c5 11. b4 b6 12. bxc5
bxc5 13. Nbd2 O-O ( { In principle, Black would like to install the knight
on d4, but } 13… Nc6 { is premature, because it leads to the undesired
queen exchange after } 14. Qa4 Qd7 15. Rfb1 Nd4 16. Qxd7+ Kxd7 17. Ne1 Rhb8
18. f3 Be6 19. Kf2 { White can hope to get a favourable form of placing the
knight on d3 and threaten Bxd4, when his stability on light squares would
become annoying. }) 14. Qa4 (14. Rb1 Nc6 $1) 14… Ng6 $1 { Black adapts
his strategy to the minor difference induced by White’s refraining from
h2-h3. In the games quoted above, the last move would lose the bishop to
g2-g4. } (14… Qc8 { would be pointless without a target on h3. } 15. Qa3
$5 { [%csl Gc5] }) 15. Kh1 { Preparing a thematic regrouping. } ( { White
cannot free himself from the pressure aginst the f3-square easily, because
} 15. h3 Bd7 16. Qa5 Qe7 { leaves the h3-pawn vulnerable. }) 15… Qe7 16.
Ne1 { With the king on g1 this move would drop an exchange to Be2. White’s
play in this phase of the gamelooks logical, being aimed to maintain the
structural flexibility, but his knights will remain quite passive. } 16…
Nf4 17. f3 Bd7 18. Qa5 Rf6 { Even in the absence of the target on h3, this
simple rook lift leads to very dangerous attack. } 19. Rf2 ( { White is not
sufficiently well prepared to attack the relatively weak c5-pawn. } 19. Nb3
Qf7 20. Rc1 Ne2 21. Rc2 Nd4 22. Bxd4 exd4 { White’s kingside is in danger.
}) 19… Rh6 20. Nf1 ( { Once again, } 20. Nb3 { leaves the kingside
vulnerable. } 20… Qh4 21. g4 Qg3 22. Bxc5 (22. Nxc5 Bxg4 $1 { [%cal
Gg3e3] }) 22… Rf8 $36) 20… g5 { [%cal Gg5g4] } 21. g4 { White tries to
consolidate on light squares, but he will fail to do so. } (21. g3 Ne6 $15
{ [%cal Ge6d4,Ga8f8] }) 21… Rh3 22. Ng3 h5 $1 23. gxh5 (23. Bxf4 exf4 24.
Nxh5 Rf8 $1 { This strong move completes the mobilisation of forces,
maintaining all the threats. } (24… Bxg4 $6 25. fxg4 Qxe4+ $2 26. Nf3 $18
{ [%cal Gh5f6] In this line, we can see that a rook would be most useful on
f8. }) 25. Kg2 Rh4 26. h3 Be8 $36) 23… Rf8 24. Qd2 Qf7 25. Rc1 Be6 $15 {
Black is perfectly regrouped for the attack, while White can do little more
than wait. In the game he will force the events and go down quickly. } 26.
Bxf4 $6 exf4 27. Nf5 Bxf5 28. exf5 Qxf5 29. Nd3 g4 $40 30. Qe2 g3 31. Rg2
Qxh5 32. Qe6+ Kg7 33. Rcc2 Re8 34. Qd5 Qxd5 35. cxd5 Re3 36. Nf2 Re1+ 37.
Rg1 Rxh2# 0-1

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