Chess PGN Game Match played Alexander Graf vs John DM Nunn- in Bundesliga 0203, Open: King’s Indian – Saemisch, Panno formation

Chess PGN Game Match played Alexander Graf vs John DM Nunn- in Bundesliga 0203, Open: King's Indian - Saemisch, Panno formation


Match between Alexander Graf and John DM Nunn

Event: Bundesliga 0203

Variation: King’s Indian – Saemisch, Panno formation

Eco code: E84

Pgn File:


[Event “Bundesliga 0203”]
[Site “Germany”]
[Date “2003.02.08”]
[Round “10.8”]
[White “Graf, Alexander”]
[Black “Nunn, John DM”]
[Result “1/2-1/2”]
[WhiteElo “2635”]
[BlackElo “2611”]
[ECO “E84”]
[Annotator “Hazai,L”]
[EventDate “2002.10.19”]
[PlyCount “174”]
[EventType “team-tourn”]
[EventRounds “15”]
[EventCountry “GER”]
[Source “ChessBase”]
[SourceDate “2003.05.26”]
[WhiteTeam “Porz”]
[BlackTeam “Luebeck”]
[WhiteTeamCountry “GER”]
[BlackTeamCountry “GER”]

1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 Bg7 4. e4 d6 5. f3 O-O 6. Be3 Nc6 7. Nge2 a6 8.
Qd2 Rb8 9. Rc1 Bd7 10. Nd1 { White is making preparations against Black’s
normal plans 10…b5 and 10…e5. } 10… Re8 { This novelty doesn’t look
very promising. } (10… b5 $6 { is now strongly met by } 11. c5 $1 e6 12.
Nf2 Qe7 (12… b4 $6 13. g3 Na5 14. Nd3 dxc5 15. Nxc5 $16 { Black’s << is in ruins. } 15... Bb5 16. Nf4 g5 17. Nfd3 Nc6 18. Ne5 g4 $4 19. Bxb5 { 1-0 Nenashev-Gadjily, Dubai 2000 }) 13. cxd6 cxd6 14. g3 { /\ Bg2 } 14... Qd8 15. Bg2 Qa5 16. Qxa5 Nxa5 17. b3 Rfc8 18. Kd2 $14 { and White has a strong P [+], therefore the space advantage as well, Conquest-Kindermann, Germany 2000. }) (10... e6 $5 { is an interesting, unusual plan. } 11. g3 Ne8 12. Bg2 f5 13. O-O Nf6 14. Nf2 Qe7 15. f4 (15. b4 $5) 15... fxe4 16. d5 Nd8 17. Nc3 Nf7 18. Ncxe4 Nxe4 19. Nxe4 e5 20. Rfe1 Bf5 $13 { Hertneck-Schmaltz, Germany 1998 }) (10... e5 11. d5 Ne7 12. c5 $5 { White has the same reaction, as in case of 10...b5. } (12. g3 Ne8 13. Bg2 c5 14. b4 b6 15. O-O f5 16. Nf2 { 1/2-1/2 Bischoff-Nunn, Paignton 2000 }) (12. b4 $5) 12... Ne8 (12... dxc5 13. Bxc5 Ne8 { /\ Nd6 is a possibility transposing after } 14. Nec3 { to the game continuation. }) 13. b4 { against 13...dxc5 } (13. Nec3 dxc5 $5 { vacating the d6 square for the blockading N comes into consideration. } (13... f5 14. Bd3 (14. b4 { - 13.b4 })) (13... c6 14. cxd6 Nxd6 15. Bc5 $14) 14. Bxc5 Nd6 15. Bd3 f5 16. O-O Kh8 { /\ Ng8, Bh6 }) 13... f5 14. Nec3 (14. Ndc3 Nf6) 14... Nf6 15. Be2 { Finally White can finish his development. } 15... Kh8 16. Nb2 { /\ Nc4 improving the N and waiting with 0-0. } (16. O-O { castles into Black's standard ->. } 16… f4
17. Bf2 g5) 16… Nc8 { If this is necessary, then White’s advantage is
undisputable in the opening. He has a strong pressure on the <<, while Black's chances for a >> -> are problematic. } (16… f4 17. Bf2 g5 18. Nc4
{ and White’s K may remain in the [+] because of the closed character of
the position. }) 17. Nc4 (17. O-O { now comes into consideration, after one
of Black’s pieces has left the >>. } 17… f4 18. Bf2 g5 19. Qd1 $1 {
against g4. } (19. Nc4 g4)) 17… fxe4 18. fxe4 Ng4 (18… Nh5 19. Bxh5
Qh4+ 20. Bf2 Qxh5 21. O-O g5 22. Be3 h6 23. Rxf8+ Bxf8 24. Rf1 Be7 25. Ne2
Qg6 26. Ng3 $16 { Graf-Mamedov, Dubai 2002 }) 19. Bg5 ( { or simply } 19.
Bxg4 Bxg4 20. Bf2 $16 { /\ 0-0 }) 19… Bf6 20. O-O Kg7 21. Rxf6 Nxf6 22.
Bh6+ Kg8 23. Bxf8 Qxf8 24. Qe3 $16 { Graf-Nunn, BL 2001 CBM 82 }) 11. Nf2
b5 $6 { This provocative move will lead more or less forced to an exchange
sacrifice! } (11… e6 $5) 12. c5 dxc5 13. Rxc5 { Now the P structure
clearly favours White. } 13… e5 { otherwise Black has no counterplay. }
14. d5 Ne7 15. Qc2 c6 $5 { Now, or never. If the backward c P remains,
White is clearly better. } (15… Rc8 16. Nd3) 16. dxc6 Nxc6 17. Rxc6 Bxc6
18. Qxc6 $16 { Black wanted to keep the activity at any cost. However White
has time to finish his development and then two light pieces will overcome
the R slowly but surely. } 18… Bf8 19. Qc3 Rc8 20. Qd2 Qc7 21. Nc1 Bc5
22. Bxc5 Qxc5 23. Nb3 Qb6 24. Bd3 Nh5 25. g3 { and Black’s dreams of ->
cannot be realized. } 25… Ng7 26. Ng4 Red8 27. Ne3 { /\ Nd5 centralizing
the N and covering the d <-> as well. } 27… Qd6 28. Nd5 Ne8 29. Ke2 { The
K in the middle is relatively safe now. } (29. Na5 Rd7) 29… Nc7 30. Nxc7
Rxc7 31. Rd1 Qe6 32. Qe3 Qh3 33. Qf2 Qc8 34. Rd2 a5 { This is a desperate
attempt to change the course of the game. } 35. Bxb5 (35. Nxa5 Rcd7 36. Nb3
$16 { was even simpler. }) 35… a4 36. Rxd8+ Qxd8 37. Nd2 Rc2 38. Qe3 Qa5
39. Bc4 Qb4 40. Bd5 Qxb2 { Black has activated his pieces, but White’s
position remained rock-solid and everything is defended. } 41. f4 Kg7 42.
fxe5 Qxe5 43. Qa7 Qf6 44. Kd1 Rc8 45. Qxa4 (45. e5 Qxe5 46. Qxf7+ Kh8)
45… Qa1+ 46. Ke2 Qg1 47. Kd3 Qxh2 48. Qd4+ f6 49. Qa7+ (49. e5 $1 { looks
crisper. } 49… Qxg3+ 50. Bf3 Kh6 51. exf6 $18) 49… Kh8 50. Qe3 Qh5 51.
a4 Qe5 52. Nc4 Qa1 53. Qb6 h5 54. a5 Qf1+ 55. Kc3 Qe1+ 56. Kb2 Qxg3 57.
Qxf6+ Kh7 58. a6 { The a P should decide the battle… } 58… Rb8+ 59. Bb7
Qc7 60. Nd6 Qb6+ 61. Kc2 Rg8 62. e5 Rg7 63. Nc4 (63. Ne4 Rc7+) 63… Qd4
64. Qf1 (64. Kb3) 64… Rc7 65. Kb3 Qc5 66. Qd3 $2 { This serious blunder
ruins White’s efforts at once. } (66. Qe2) 66… Qb5+ 67. Kc3 Qxe5+ $11 {
and the fall of the e P is really serious! With the new time limit these
blunders occur frequently, ruining the quality of the game. } 68. Kd2 Qb5
69. Ne3 Qb4+ 70. Ke2 Qb2+ 71. Qd2 Qb5+ 72. Kf2 Rf7+ 73. Kg1 Qb6 74. Kg2
Rxb7 75. axb7 Qxb7+ 76. Nd5 Qf7 77. Qd4 Qf5 78. Ne3 Qe6 79. Kf2 Qf7+ 80.
Kg3 Qc7+ 81. Kh3 Qe7 82. Nd5 Qe6+ 83. Kh2 Qe2+ 84. Kh1 Qf3+ 85. Kh2 Qe2+
86. Kg3 Qg4+ 87. Qxg4 hxg4 1/2-1/2

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