Chess PGN Game Match played Veselin Topalov vs Artur Jussupow- in Novgorod, Open: Ruy Lopez – modern Steinitz defence, Rubinstein variation

Chess PGN Game Match played Veselin Topalov vs Artur Jussupow- in Novgorod, Open: Ruy Lopez - modern Steinitz defence, Rubinstein variation


Match between Veselin Topalov and Artur Jussupow

Event: Novgorod

Variation: Ruy Lopez – modern Steinitz defence, Rubinstein variation

Eco code: C75

Pgn File:


[Event “Novgorod”]
[Site “Novgorod”]
[Date “1995.05.28”]
[Round “2”]
[White “Topalov, Veselin”]
[Black “Jussupow, Artur”]
[Result “1-0”]
[WhiteElo “2630”]
[BlackElo “2660”]
[ECO “C75”]
[Annotator “Topalov,V”]
[EventDate “1995.05.??”]
[PlyCount “65”]
[EventType “tourn”]
[EventRounds “9”]
[EventCountry “RUS”]
[Source “ChessBase”]
[SourceDate “1995.10.01”]
[EventCategory “17”]

1. e4 { King Wedberg Dolmatov } 1… e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 d6 5.
c3 Bd7 { Black also has 5…f5, which leads to sharper positions. } 6. d4
Nge7 (6… g6 { Dolmatov }) 7. Be3 { In my opinion, this gives white more
choice than the normal 7.0-0. } 7… Ng6 { In his third game of the match
against Anand Yusupov played 7… h6 but couldn t equalise after 8.Nbd2 g5
9.de de 10.h4! } 8. h4 $1 { This was my idea. The white pawns restrict the
black pieces. } 8… h5 (8… Be7 { Dolmatov } 9. h5 (9. g3 { Wedberg }
9… h6 10. d5 Nb8 11. Bc2 Bg4 12. Nbd2 Nd7 13. Nf1 Nf6 14. N1h2 Bd7 15.
Nd2 h5 16. a4 $14 { Milos,G-Magomedov,M/Moscow ol/1994 }) 9… Nh4 10. Nxh4
Bxh4 11. d5 Nb8 12. Bxd7+ Nxd7 13. Qg4 Bf6 14. c4 O-O 15. O-O $10) (8…
Bg4 { Dolmatov } 9. Bxc6+ bxc6 10. Nbd2 Be7 11. Qa4 Bd7) 9. g3 (9. Ng5 {
Dolmatov } 9… Be7 10. Bb3 $16) 9… Be7 10. d5 Nb8 11. Bxd7+ (11. Nfd2 {
Dolmatov } 11… b5 12. Bb3 c5 13. a4) 11… Nxd7 12. Nfd2 { Now a typical
indian structure arises with white square B exchanged, which clearly favors
white. Also the Ng6 is out of play. } 12… Nf6 13. f3 O-O (13… c5 $5 {
Dolmatov } 14. c4 b5 15. Nc3 Rb8 $14) 14. c4 c5 { Stops the standard
developing of the white attack on the queenside – Nc3, b4, Nb3, c5 etc. } (
14… c6 { Dolmatov } 15. Nc3 Qd7 $16) (14… b5 $132 { Wedberg }) 15. Nc3
Qd7 16. a4 a5 $2 { Black is clearly worse on the kingside, so he had to
play the more flexible 16…b6 preparing b5 in some positions. This i
positional suicide. Almost anything is better. } (16… Bd8 { Dolmatov }
17. a5 { Wedberg } 17… Bc7 { With much more play for Black than in the
game. }) 17. Qe2 Kh7 18. O-O-O { King Cleverly, White has waited before
committing his K, and now that the Qside has closed he moves it there.
Black has no counterplay to off-set White’s ferocious Kside attack. } 18…
Rh8 19. Nf1 $1 { The knight looks for its best place on f5, where it can
cause much damage for black. } 19… Kg8 20. Bd2 Ne8 (20… Kf8 $5 {
Dolmatov } 21. Ne3 Ke8 22. Nf5 Bf8 $16) 21. Ne3 Nf8 $6 { Black has to be
more afraid of f4 than of g4. That s why Nc7, Bf6 and Re8 was the right
plan. } 22. b3 { I didn t know where to put the Rd1, so I made a useful
move. } 22… g6 $6 { Following the wrong plan. In such positions each pawn
move weakens the position. It was still not too late for Nc7 and Re8. } (
22… Nc7 $142 { /\Re8 }) 23. f4 Bf6 24. Rdf1 Qe7 25. f5 $1 { The e5-square
is well-protected, but after 22…g6 the f-file became weaker. Now the
black king is in danger. } 25… Ng7 26. Nb5 b6 $2 { The final mistake.
After 26…Nd7 I had 27.fg6 fg6 28.Nc7 Ra7 29.Rf3 b6 30.Nb5 ok } (26… g5
{ Dolmatov } 27. g4 gxh4 28. gxh5 Bg5 29. f6 $1 Bxf6 30. Rhg1 $16) 27. fxg6
fxg6 28. g4 $1 { The kingside opens. } (28. Rf2 { Dolmatov } 28… Nh7 29.
Rhf1 Rf8) 28… Bxh4 29. Nxd6 Qxd6 30. Rxh4 Nd7 31. gxh5 Rxh5 32. Rxh5 Nxh5
(32… gxh5 { Wedberg } 33. Rg1 $18) 33. Nf5 (33. Nf5 { Wedberg } 33… Qc7
34. Ne7+ Kg7 35. Nxg6 Kxg6 36. Qg4+ $18) 1-0

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