Chess PGN Game Match played Nigel D Short vs John DM Nunn- in OHRA-A, Open: Ruy Lopez – Marshall, main line, 12.d2d4

Chess PGN Game Match played Nigel D Short vs John DM Nunn- in OHRA-A, Open: Ruy Lopez - Marshall, main line, 12.d2d4


Match between Nigel D Short and John DM Nunn

Event: OHRA-A

Variation: Ruy Lopez – Marshall, main line, 12.d2d4

Eco code: C89

Pgn File:


[Event “OHRA-A”]
[Site “Brussels”]
[Date “1986.12.??”]
[Round “8”]
[White “Short, Nigel D”]
[Black “Nunn, John DM”]
[Result “0-1”]
[WhiteElo “2615”]
[BlackElo “2590”]
[ECO “C89”]
[Annotator “Nunn,J”]
[EventDate “1986.12.??”]
[PlyCount “78”]
[EventType “tourn”]
[EventRounds “10”]
[EventCountry “BEL”]
[Source “ChessBase”]
[SourceDate “2004.01.01”]
[EventCategory “16”]

1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bb5 a6 4. Ba4 Nf6 5. O-O Be7 6. Re1 b5 7. Bb3 O-O 8.
c3 d5 9. exd5 Nxd5 10. Nxe5 Nxe5 11. Rxe5 c6 12. d4 Bd6 13. Re2 Qh4 14. g3
Qh5 15. Nd2 Bh3 16. f3 Bc7 17. a4 b4 18. c4 Nf6 { Up to here both players
have been following a game Kuporosov-Malaniuk, USSR 1985, in which White
played 19.R e1 with a roughly level position. Short plays a powerful
novelty which gives White a clear advantage immediately. } 19. Ne4 $1 $146
(19. Re1 Rad8 20. Ne4 Nxe4 21. Rxe4 Bf5 22. Re1 Qh3 23. Re2 Rfe8 24. Bg5 f6
25. Be3 h5 26. c5+ Kf8 27. Bc4 Bxg3 28. hxg3 Rxe3 29. Rxe3 Qxg3+ 30. Kf1
Qh3+ 31. Kg1 Qg3+ 32. Kf1 Qh3+ { 1/2-1/2 Kuporosov,V-Malaniuk,V/ URS 1985
(32) }) 19… Qg6 ( { The obvious } 19… Qxf3 $6 20. Ng5 Qh5 21. Nxh3 Qxh3
22. Bg5 Qf5 23. Bh4 { is very bad for Black, who faces the two bishops and
the threat of R f2. }) ( { Moreover } 19… Nxe4 20. Rxe4 Bf5 21. Re7 $1
Bd6 22. Re3 { doesn’t give enough for the pawn. }) 20. Nf2 Bf5 (20… Bxg3
{ is met by } 21. Nxh3) 21. Bc2 Rfe8 ( { It is marginally better to play }
21… Rad8 22. Bxf5 Qxf5 { , but } 23. Rd2 { followed by R d3 enables White
to hold on to his extra pawn without serious problems. }) 22. Bxf5 Qxf5 23.
Rxe8+ Rxe8 24. Kg2 { It is all so simple. Black is now just a pawn down
with a bad queenside pawn structure. White intends b3 followed by Bb2 or R
a2, completing his development. } 24… Rd8 25. Be3 Bb6 26. Qb3 Bxd4 27.
Rd1 c5 28. Bxd4 cxd4 29. Qxb4 { Black’s passed pawn is blockaded, while
White has a 3 to 1 majority. Since my position was hopeless, I decided to
give up another pawn in the hope of a swindle. } 29… Qd7 30. Qb6 h5 31.
Qxa6 { Perhaps the first ray of hope for Black. } ( { White could have
played } 31. h4 { before taking the pawn. Of course White is still winning,
but at least Black can create a threat. }) 31… Rb8 32. Rd2 h4 33. Qa5 { A
good move. The queen cannot return to the centre directly from a6, so White
improves the queen’s position while at the same time threatening b4. }
33… Rb3 34. Qc5 Qb7 ( { Black would have preferred to play } 34… h3+
35. Nxh3 Rxf3 { but } 36. Rxd4 $1 (36. Kxf3 Qg4+ 37. Kg2 Qe4+ 38. Kf1 Qb1+
{ drawing. }) 36… Qb7 37. Rd8+ Kh7 38. Ng5+ { wins. }) 35. Rd3 { A
serious error allowing Black to draw. } (35. Nd3 $2 { was also bad because
of } 35… Ne4 $1 36. fxe4 Qxe4+ 37. Kh3 Rxd3 { , when the powerful d-pawn
should enable Black to draw. }) ( { However the simple } 35. Qf5 $142 $1 {
would have stopped Black’s tricks. }) 35… h3+ $1 36. Kxh3 Rxd3 37. Nxd3
Qxf3 { Suddenly Black has dangerous counterplay. } 38. Qxd4 $2 { The second
blunder throws away the draw – a tragic end to the game after White had
produced a very important opening novelty. } ( { White should have accepted
that he can no longer win and play } 38. Nf4 Ne4 ( { not } 38… Qf1+ 39.
Kh4 $1 { and Black’s attack is stopped. }) 39. Qc8+ Kh7 40. Qf5+ { with
perpetual check. }) 38… Qf1+ 39. Kh4 Qf5 (39… Qf5 40. g4 g5+ 41. Kg3
Ne4+ 42. Kg2 Qxg4+ { followed by a knight check wins the queen. }) 0-1

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